Research & Projects - Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

Research & Projects

Dr. Cromer’s SPARTA Lab conducts research that addresses the prevention and treatment of psychological trauma that can be experienced in response to adverse life experiences. Dr. Cromer is passionate about social justice and works to build human resilience to adversity in at-risk and disadvantaged populations. Dr. Cromer’s prevention work is informed by mindfulness and cognitive behavioral theories, aimed to help people improve self-regulation, sleep, and develop a healthy, flexible cognitions. Dr. Cromer’s work on historical and intergenerational transmission of trauma distinguishes between these as distinct but often overlapping phenomena. Dr. Cromer’s lab takes a culturally humble approach to our work.

Current Studies for Participant Enrollment:

Clinical Outcomes of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Nightmares in Children (CBT-NC)
The CBT-NC Project (in collaboration with Dr. Tara Buck at OU School of Community Medicine Child Psychiatry) is a randomized, controlled clinical trial of a nightmare treatment for children aged 6-17. CBT-NC is a five session therapy that requires no medications or overnight visits. All therapy sessions occur over telehealth. We are enrolling participants now. For more information, please contact us at 918-631-3242 or email ele4807@utulsa.edu for an appointment. Therapy is provided free and all research assessments are compensated with gift cards.

Development of the Structured Clinical Interview of Sleep Disorders in Children
Mollie Rischard Kimrey is developing this structured clinical interview in collaboration with Dr. Cromer. We are enrolling families now. Children must be ages 8-17 and both child and a caregiver will be interviewed. Compensation is provided for this one-time, 90 minute interview and preliminary diagnostic information about sleep will be provided to participants. For more information, please contact us at 918-631-3242 or email mer597@utulsa.edu.


University of Tulsa Pre-Candidacy Projects

Aviva Johns (Anticipated 2021)
Examining the role of family communication and identity in understanding the impact of historical trauma

Jack Stimson (2020)
Studying possible predictors of injury in football players

Brooke Pangelinan (2020) 
Examining nightmare distress and frequency changes across treatment, in children

Devin Barlaan (2018)
A pilot study: The relationship between adverse childhood experience (ACEs), parenting stress and efficacy among military and veteran parents

Mollie Rischard (2018)
The role of executive function in predicting children’s outcomes in a cognitive behavioral therapy for trauma-related nightmares

Kristen Gray (2017)
Examining posttraumatic nightmare content in children and its relation to posttraumatic psychopathology

Danielle Zanotti (2014)
Family deployment preparedness, reintegration attitudes, and PTSD symptoms in military fathers with young children

Emily Kaier (2013)
Adverse childhood experiences: Allostatic load and health among elite athletes

Ashley Louie (2013)
Military family stress and resilience

Katherine Cunningham (2012)
Human trafficking myth acceptance, sexual trauma history, and attitudes about trafficking victims

University of Tulsa Senior Projects

Allie Morton (2021)
Examining the relationship of nightmares to suicidality in children

Andrew Helt (2020)
Studying reasons for declining participation in clinical research of parents whose children are suffering from nightmares

Katie Sinor (2020)
An investigation of the impact on car accidents when high schools shift to later school start times

Hannah Walker (2018)
Promoting health and resilience on college campuses: An examination of the University of Tulsa’s bicycle encouragement program

Erin Camp (2016)
Examining the perceived cost and benefit of research participation among military mothers

Brandi Krieg (2015)
Examining the impact of stress on musculoskeletal injuries.

Isaura Enrique (2015)
Examining the effects of sleep hygiene in Hispanic children

Tom Gaus (2014)
Correlates of depression in athletes

Brooke Hinch (2014)
Examining the relationship between two measures of executive function in young children

Chase Winterberg (2013)
Attachment during military reintegration

Mitchell Johnson (2012)
Psychological help-seeking stigma among NCAA athletes

Kaylene Rojas (2012)
A study about the benefits of interacting with a therapy dog following a medical exam


Research In Action

Southern Regional Education Board Conference 2019

Pictured from left to right: Devin Barlaan, Dr. Cromer, & Brooke Pangelinan
SPARTA at Southern Regional Education Board Conference Fall 2019

Pictured from left to right: Mollie Rischard Kimrey and Devin Barlaan
Sparta at conference

Pictured: Devin Barlaan
Barlaan at Conference


34th Annual ISTSS Meeting (2018)
Pictured from left to right: Dr. Cromer and Devin Barlaan


21st Annual TU Research Day The University of Tulsa Student Research Colloquium, Tulsa, OK (2018)
Pictured from left to right: Mollie Rischard and Hannah Walker


33rd Annual ISTSS Meeting (2017)
Pictured from left to right: Mollie Rischard and Kristen Gray


17th Annual TU Research Day The University of Tulsa Student Research Colloquium, Tulsa, OK.
Pictured: Montego Jordan


29th Annual ISTSS Meeting (2013)
Pictured from left to right: Renee Vanasse and Emily Kaier


15th annual University of Tulsa Student Research Colloquium and the 86th annual American Association for the Advancement of Science Regional Conference, Southwestern and Rocky Mountain Division (2012)
Pictured: Katherine Cunningham


Service Projects

Student Health, Athletic Performance and Education (SHAPE) Project

In collaboration with TITAN, we have collected data from over 400 NCAA Division I athletes at TU. We have assessed the overall need for psychological services and examining how athletes’ current life stressors relate to sleep, injury incidence and recovery, as well as athletic performance. This was a longitudinal study with annual assessments. The results of this student informed evidence-based psycho-educational interventions related to sleep hygiene, time management, goal setting, stress reduction, and mental toughness. Psycho-educational interventions are offered to student-athletes and teams at no cost. No data is being collected at this time.