university of tulsa logo

Courses offered by the program in religion are designed to deepen the understanding of humanity’s personal and cultural experience of religion. Students may profit from these courses regardless of their major field of study or career intentions.

The belief and practices of religious humanity, past and present, are treated in the course offerings of this faculty. These offerings include introductory courses of interest to the general student and courses in the following curriculum areas: the Bible and literature; ethics and society; and philosophy and religion.

The study of religion is in the tradition of the liberal arts, and the program in religion at The University of Tulsa stands among the other humanistic disciplines. The course of study encourages a critical approach to religious texts and traditions, emphasizing literary, historical, philosophical, theological, and moral inquiries. Course offerings are designed to expose students to the variety of religious languages, literatures and modes of inquiry.

Courses are taught in the following curriculum areas: the Bible; early Christian thought; medieval Christian and Jewish thought; studies in Catholicism, Protestantism and Judaism; ethics and society; church-state relations; and philosophy and religion. Like other degree programs in the humanities, the Bachelor of Arts in religion cultivates the habits of mind one needs in order to think and write with care and precision, and prepares one for graduate and professional studies.

Program Objectives

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Students will develop an understanding of how great thinkers and ideas in philosophy and religion, with an emphasis on philosophical traditions, have shaped our culture.
  2. Students will develop analytic and interpretive reading skills by reading texts in philosophy and religion, with an emphasis on philosophical traditions. As a result, students will develop a variety of important intellectual skills, including critical thinking and evaluation, the ability to see implications and alternatives, and to read and write with insight and persuasive power.

RELIGION

Outcomes for Learning Objective 1

  • Students on track to complete the undergraduate program in Religion will be able to demonstrate and understanding of tensions in religious traditions.
  • Students on track to complete the undergraduate program in Religion will be able to interpret and evaluate masterpieces of religious traditions.
  • Students on track to complete the undergraduate program in Religion will be able to demonstrate knowledge of central movements, arguments, and approaches of religious traditions.

Outcomes for Learning Objective 2

  • Students on track to complete the major in Religion will be able to demonstrate reading comprehension of conceptually dense, logically complex religious texts with sensitivity to their context.
  • Students on track to complete the undergraduate program in Religion will be able to demonstrate a grasp of the arguments advanced in lectures, discussions and assigned readings.
  • Students on track to complete the undergraduate program in Religion will be able to produce critical analyses and evaluations of religious texts, demonstrating sensitivity to the conceptual nuances and counter-arguments introduced in readings and discussions.
Degree Options

Religion, B.A.

Encourages a critical approach to religious texts and traditions, emphasizing literary, historical, philosophical, theological, and moral inquiries.

Religion Minor

A minor in religion may be an attractive option for students pursuing a variety of programs.

Typical Four Year Schedule

FRESHMAN – FALL SEMESTERFRESHMAN – SPRING SEMESTER
The Great Conversation I: Ancient and MedievalFirst Seminar
Exposition and ArgumentationContemporary Mathematics
Freshman ExperienceBeginning Language II*
Block I Aesthetic Inquiry and Creative ExperienceBlock II - Social & Historical Interpretation
Beginning Language IBible and Literature course
SOPHOMORE – FALL SEMESTERSOPHOMORE – SPRING SEMESTER
The Great Conversation II: Modern and ContemporaryPhilosophical Theology course
Block I Aesthetic Inquiry & Creative ExperienceWestern Theology, Ethics and Society
Block II - Social & Historical InterpretationIntermediate Language II*
Block III - Scientific Investigation (w/ lab)Block II - Social & Historical Interpretation
Intermediate Language I*Block III - Scientific Investigation
Liberal Arts and Preparation for Life after Graduation
JUNIOR – FALL SEMESTERJUNIOR – SPRING SEMESTER
Block II - Historical and Social InterpretationReligion Elective (3000 level +)
Seminar on Religion and PhilosophyReligion Elective (3000 level +)
Religion Elective (3000 level +)Minor
Religion Elective (3000 level +)General Elective
MinorGeneral Elective
SENIOR – FALL SEMESTERSENIOR – SPRING SEMESTER
Religion Elective (3000 level +)Religion Elective (3000 level +)
Religion Elective (3000 level +)Minor
MinorGeneral Elective
General ElectiveSenior Project

*May be substituted for another elective.