Anthropology Facilities and Collections

PALEOANTHROPOLOGY AND HUMAN OSTEOLOGY COLLECTION

The paleoanthropology and human osteology lab hosts a large collection of museum quality casts of fossils hominins and primates spanning the cenozonic. In addition, there is a selection of casts of forensic, pathological and of a modern human variability samples. TU has a large collection of natural bone human skeletons, both articulated and disarticulated that allow for a research and teaching in anthropological and biological sciences. Learn more…

For access to the Paleoanthropology and Human Osteology Collection, contact Miriam Belmaker. 


DONALD O. HENRY NEAR EASTERN LITHIC ARTIFACTS COLLECTION

The laboratory is a repository for one of the largest collections (more than 500,000 specimens) housed in North America of chipped stone artifacts recovered from prehistoric sites in the Near East. The lithic assemblages largely represent southern Levantine industries stretching over an interval of ~250,000 years. Learn more…

For access to the Donald O. Henry Near Eastern Lithic Artifacts Collection, contact Danielle Macdonald. 


SURFACE METROLOGY AND TRIBOLOGY FACILITY

The focus of research in the laboratory of surface metrology and tribology is the analysis of use-wear patterns on a wide range of archaeological materials, including but not limited to materials as dental enamel, bone, lithics and ceramics. Our current research projects include the reconstruction of paleoenvironments during the evolution of the Genus Homo in Africa and western Asia, the extinction of the Neanderthals in the Southern Levant and the emergence of modern humans. Learn more…

For access to the Surface Metrology and Tribology Facility, contact Miriam Belmaker.


DON R. DICKSON LITHIC COMPARATIVE COLLECTION

The Don R. Dickson Lithic Comparative Collection is a large reference collection of lithic raw materials, assembled by Don Dickson over the course of his career. Dickson, an archeologist and flint-knapper, has particular expertise in lithics, lithic sources and Ozark prehistoric peoples. He excavated Calf Creek Cave and named the Calf Creek and Searcy points.

While the United States Midwest comprises the bulk of this lithic raw material comparative collection, it also contains samples from around the world. Each sample is documented by location and type, with several sources showing the range of variability for each material type. 

The collection contains two research components: an organized display of each raw material sample and bulk samples of most materials for additional experimentation. With more than 1,300 lithic raw material types, this comprehensive collection enables research on raw material sourcing, heat treating, experimental replication and use-wear studies.

For access to the Don R. Dickson Lithic Comparative Collection, contact Danielle Macdonald.