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utulsa.edu

Program Objectives

Undergraduate Program Objectives

Students who complete the Bachelor’s degree will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the theories and methods of the four fields of anthropology – archaeology, social/cultural anthropology, linguistics, and physical anthropology – and be able to analyze their interrelationships.
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of the challenges of social change and civic engagement that will permit them to work effectively with others.
  3. Obtain employment or apply to graduate school.
  4. Demonstrate a greater appreciation of the diversity of human cultures.
  5. Demonstrate an appreciation of the variety of human cultures, past and present, including their connections, similarities, and contrasts – a truly global view.

M.A. Program Objectives

Students will specialize in one of two Master’s degree tracks with or without a thesis: Archaeology or Cultural Anthropology. After completing the Master’s degree in Anthropology, students will:

  1. Have a broad knowledge of theory and research across the sub-disciplines of anthropology.
  2. Communicate research findings effectively in written and spoken presentations
  3. Demonstrate the ability to collect and analyze anthropological data.

Ph.D. Program Objectives

After completing the Ph.D. in Anthropology, students will:

  1. Contribute original, problem-oriented research that will make a significant contribution to the discipline.
  2. Communicate research findings effectively in written and in oral presentations.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to collect and analyze anthropological data.

Department Statements

Anthropology is the study of humans – past and present. As anthropologists, we are both sensitive to cultural and religious variations among people, and we appreciate the long evolutionary history of our species. True understanding of human cultural and biological variability is predicated on the study and teaching of evolution as one of the cornerstones of the field. The faculty of anthropology at The University of Tulsa affirm and support the statement of the American Association of Anthropology (AAA) (2000) and the statement of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) on the teaching of evolution.

History is plagued by misconceptions of the concept of race. As scientists in a field that is focused on the analyses of human variation through myriad of lens, we assert that modern and past can be understood as the expression of genetic diversity within human populations and that race does not exist in humans. The TU Department of Anthropology endorse the statement of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) and the statement of the American Association of Anthropology (AAA) (1998) on the concept of race.