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utulsa.edu

Facilities and Labs

 

Human Ecology Laboratory

BODY-artifactsThe Laboratory of Human Ecology is focused on research about human-environmental interactions over long time periods. We work primarily with pottery, skeletal, and environmental data from Native American sites, European trade items, and historic documents. Current projects are funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, private donations, The University of Tulsa, and the Department of Defense. Read more…

For more information and access to these collections, please contact Dr. Thomas Foster.


Zooarchaeology Lab and Paleoecology Lab

Hosting a zooarchaeological comparative collection, the lab is currently conducting paleoecological and zooarchaeological analyses on faunal assemblages from Israel, Jordan, South Africa and the Republic of Georgia. The basis for this research is the ever-growing comparative collection, which we are currently developing. The collections includes a unique assemblage of mammal teeth casts from old world Lower and Middle Paleolithic archaeological sites dating from 1.5 Million years ago to 30,000 years ago from sites in Israel and Armenia; micro and macro taphonomy collection and a small but rapidly growing modern comparative collection of vertebrates. All which serve in the teaching of zooarchaeology and archaeology course and research in the department. Full website…

For more information and access to these collections, please contact Dr. Miriam Belmaker.


Paleoanthroplogy and Human Osteology Laboratory

The paleoanthropology and human osteology lab hosts a large collection of museum quality casts of fossils hominins and primates spanning the cenozonic. In addition we host a selection of casts of forensic, pathological and of a modern human variability samples. We have a large collection of natural bone human skeletons, both articulated and disarticulated that allow for a research and teaching in anthropological and biological sciences. Full website…

For more information and access to these collections please contact Dr. Miriam Belmaker.


Lithic Microwear and Technology Laboratory 

The laboratory for Lithic Microwear and Technology conducts research on understanding human behavior through the application of microwear analysis to archaeological assemblages. Current research includes the digitization of these experimental collections for the creation of an online microwear reference database, microwear analysis of lithics from prehistoric sites in Jordan, and further experimental work for methodological development of microwear practice. Full website…

For more information and access to these collections, please contact Dr. Danielle Macdonald


Donald O. Henry Near Eastern Lithic Artifacts Collection

Near-Eastern-Lithics-labThe laboratory is a repository for one of the largest collections (more than 500,000 specimens) housed in North America of chipped stone artifacts recovered from prehistoric sites in the Near East. The lithic assemblages largely represent southern Levantine industries stretching over an interval of ~250,000 years.
Full website…

 

For more information and access to these collections, please contact Dr. Danielle Macdonald.


Surface Metrology and Tribology Facility 

The focus of research in the laboratory of surface metrology and tribology is the analysis of use-wear patterns on a wide range of archaeological materials, including but not limited to materials as dental enamel, bone, lithics and ceramics. Our current research projects include the reconstruction of paleoenvironments during the evolution of the Genus Homo in Africa and western Asia, the extinction of the Neanderthals in the Southern Levant and the emergence of modern humans. Full website…

For more information and access to these collections, please contact Dr. Miriam Belmaker.


Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum

Students are encouraged to study in the archives, which houses more than 100,000 rare books, documents, maps and unpublished works.The collection includes a vast archive of printed documents, dating back to the time of Columbus, that detail Spanish arrival in the New World, as well as documents that tell the stories of the New England colonies, Westward expansion and the experiences of America’s native peoples.